The UK’s spookiest roads

Take a drive with us along some of the UK’s most haunted stretches of road. Prepare for a nail-biting time…

Barford Bridge, Northamptonshire

The bridge over the A6003 between Kettering and Corby is allegedly haunted by the ghost of a bearded monk. There have been numerous sightings, one reported by a police officer that resulted in a night vigil by the Northamptonshire Paranormal Investigation Team back in 2009. They reported an unusual drop in temperature in the area, as well as loud banging when they tried to make contact with the spirit world. Spooky stuff.

Barford Bridge
The Devil’s Highway, near Bolton

The Devil’s Highway, near Bolton

You might think it’s inevitable that a road named after the number of the devil has a bad track record, but search online for ‘the A666 ghost’ and numerous unexplained sightings pop up in your search results.

Often referred to as The Devil’s Highway, the A666 is considered dangerous by locals because of the number of accidents caused by drivers swerving to miss dark shadows, which appear from nowhere. In 2015, chilling footage of a ghostly figure walking towards a car was published by the local press. Simon Entwistle, ghost hunter and author of Ghostly Tales of the Unexpected, believes the footage has some authenticity. ‘Would someone go out of their way to dress like that and actually scare someone?’ he asks. We don’t know which outcome is scarier…

Blue Bell Hill, Kent

The ghost of Blue Bell Hill could be straight out of the plot of a chilling horror film… Numerous sightings over the decades describe the ghost of a woman who was killed in a road crash in 1965 – on the day she was due to get married. ‘Locals say she haunts the road, wearing a white dress and jumping out in front of startled drivers who then believe they’ve hit and injured her,’ explains Joe Holbrook, who lives in the area. ‘When they get out of their car to help, she simply disappears.’

Blue Bell Hill, Kent
Cock Lane, near the Old Bailey in London

Cock Lane, near the Old Bailey in London

The story of the Cock Lane haunting attracted huge public attention in 1762, when strange noises and ghostly apparitions were heard and seen in a house on the lane. Elizabeth Kent, the wife of the then tenant William Kent, had previously died in childbirth, and William and Elizabeth’s sister Fanny had since begun a secret relationship. Soon after, the pair reported strange noises in their house, which many believed were caused by Elizabeth’s ghost.

When Fanny later died from supposed smallpox, rumours circulated that Kent had killed both women, poisoning Fanny with arsenic. It was then said that Fanny was haunting the property to get the true story of her death across to the living.

The Ghost Road, Dumfries and Galloway

Often referred to as the most haunted road in Scotland, the Kinmount Straight on the A75 between Gretna and Dumfries is home to frequent strange sightings and phantom collisions with pedestrians, who disappear straight after. The sightings began in the 1950s, and in 1997 Donna Maxwell informed the police that she’d hit a man on the road but couldn’t find any trace of him – and neither could police when they investigated.

The Ghost Road, Dumfries and Galloway
The Old Tay Bridge, Dundee

The Old Tay Bridge, Dundee

The first Tay Bridge was opened in 1878, but just over a year later it was weakened by a storm and collapsed while a passenger train was crossing it, killing everyone on board. Legend has it that every year on the anniversary of the tragedy, a ghost train is seen crossing the section on which the crash took place. Replaced by a second bridge in 1887, remains of the original bridge can still be seen today.

The B519 by The Spaniard’s Inn, Hampstead

Curled around one of North London’s best drinking spots, the B519 between Hampstead and Highgate is reportedly haunted by the ghost of notorious criminal and highwayman Dick Turpin, whose father owned The Spaniard’s Inn during the eighteenth century. The narrow country lane takes a sharp turn as it reaches the pub, creating the ideal vantage point for highwaymen to pounce on coaches on their journey to or from London. It’s said that Turpin haunts the road and often the pub, and there are also rumours that the area on which the car park now sits is haunted by a horse – perhaps Turpin’s own famous Black Bess?  

The B519 by The Spaniard’s Inn, Hampstead
Sally in the Woods, Wiltshire

Sally in the Woods, Wiltshire

According to legend, this road (the A636 if you want its less interesting moniker) is nicknamed Sally in the Woods after a young girl in a white nightgown ran out in front of a car and was killed. Or was it a Victorian lady trying to escape from the tower at nearby Brown’s Folly? Or maybe you choose to believe the story that a gypsy girl was locked in the tower and left to die? Whatever the reason, the road is well known for hauntings and has seen eight fatal collisions, seven of which have been unexplained, causing many to believe the cause to be supernatural. 

Feeling spooked? We can help you back down to earth with some ace deals on your car insurance

Looking for a Quote?

Get a new car insurance quote in seconds and start saving

Get a quote