Named driver car insurance


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Frequently asked questions

  • What is named driver insurance?
  • What kind of cover will the named driver have?
  • How does my no claims bonus work if I add a driver to my car insurance?
  • Can I save money by adding someone to my car insurance?
  • What is fronting?
  • How can I be sure I’m not fronting?
  • Why compare named driver insurance with Compare the Market?

What is named driver insurance?

Named driver – or, as it’s sometimes called, additional driver – insurance, refers to the cover someone gets when they’re added to your policy. It means you’ve told your insurance provider that someone other than you might drive your car.

What kind of cover will the named driver have?

That depends on what kind of policy you have. If you have comprehensive insurance, your named driver will almost always have comprehensive cover. Check the policy details to make sure you’ve got the level of cover that you and the named driver need.

How does my no claims bonus work if I add a driver to my car insurance?

Your no claims bonus will still build up as normal. So, if neither of you have an accident, you’ll still be on track for your discount.  

But if your named driver has an accident, it’s likely to affect your bonus. That’s because, regardless of who’s driving, you’ll be making a claim and your insurance provider will need to pay out.  

Few policies allow your named driver to build up a no-claims bonus. This is worth bearing in mind if you’re adding a young driver to your policy, as it means they won’t receive a no-claims discount until they take out a policy in their own name. However, your insurance provider may offer the young person a discount based on their driving history in your car, if the young person takes out a policy with them.

Can I save money by adding someone to my car insurance?

If you’re a student, or a young driver or inexperienced driver, insurance providers consider you high risk, which will be reflected in the price of your premium. But if you share your car with an experienced driver, you could reduce the cost of your premium by adding that driver to your policy.  

This is because you’ll be spending less time driving the car, which means your chances of having an accident and making a claim are reduced. That could mean cheaper insurance.  

But if you’re keen to have your own insurance, there are options. You could consider a telematics policy, also known as a black box policy, which monitors your driving and could reward you with lower premiums if you drive safely.

What is fronting?

Fronting is when someone claims to be the car’s main driver, but someone else is using it more often. Often a more experienced driver (usually a parent) falsely insures the car in their own name, but a younger, less experienced driver (their child) is actually the main driver.  

If you give your insurance provider false information to reduce the cost of your premiums, your policy could be invalidated. What’s more, fronting is insurance fraud and you could be prosecuted – so don’t do it.

How can I be sure I’m not fronting?

It’s easy. Just make sure the person who drives the car most is named as the main driver on the policy. If it’s genuinely a 50/50 split, talk to your insurance provider.

Why compare named driver insurance with Compare the Market?

We independently compare named driver car insurance deals from more than 90 of the UK’s most trusted car insurance providers.

We’ll show you policies based on price, level of cover, add-ons or payment terms, helping you compare policies based on your needs.

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