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The Cyber Security Challenge


Millions of people have fallen victim to credit card fraudsters and online scammers over the past year, with an estimated £4.7 billion stolen from spenders across the UK. Nearly a quarter of us have had their card cancelled or replaced due to attempted fraud over the past 12 months, suggesting that we are more susceptible to cybercrime than we might think. 

How vulnerable are you to cybercrime?

The Cyber Security challenge to find out just how likely you are to fall foul of online scams – where you can test your ability to recognise phishing emails, fraudulent websites and scams, and learn some handy tips to avoid being hacked along the way.

The Cyber Security challenge to find out just how likely you are to fall foul of online scams – where you can test your ability to recognise phishing emails, fraudulent websites and scams, and learn some handy tips to avoid being hacked along the way. Play

How fraud-savvy do you think you are?

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You receive a text message from HMRC, informing you that you are due a tax rebate of £264.85. The message asks for personal and financial information and includes a link to an application form that you must fill out. Is this a scam?

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You receive a cold call from your bank to alert you to suspicious activity on your account. The caller asks you to provide your PIN and account number so that the bank can secure the funds in your account and confirm your verification. Which of the below is the correct course of action?

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You receive an email from an unknown sender that addresses you by name. In the body of the email, the sender claims to have personal information and photographs of you. They also include your password which you use for some of your personal accounts, as proof that they have this material. The sender asks for £500, otherwise they will publish the photos online in 24 hours. They include a link to carry out the transfer. What do you do?

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You receive another call. This time from your bank’s fraud team. They are worried about some potentially suspicious transactions on your account. They ask you to run through your most recent purchases to confirm that they are yours. They also ask for your date of birth and to confirm which accounts you hold with them. Is this a scammer?

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You are in the process of booking a holiday and have found an excellent deal online. The site says that there only a few rooms left but that their online payment system has broken and they can only accept bank transfer. The site also advises that payments made via any other payment option could invalidate an insurance policy. What action would you take?

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You receive a call from Apple technical support, which has detected a possible virus on your computer. Is the phone call legitimate?

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While using Microsoft Word, a message from Windows appears on your screen which says you need to restart and update your software. Can the notification be trusted?

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You’ve recently joined an online dating website. You’ve been speaking to someone and it’s been going really well. They are currently working abroad for a couple of months but would love to meet up when they are back. However, unfortunately their mother is very ill and is not able arrange a time to meet yet. However they ask if you could help with paying for some of the private medical bills and offering in return that they will pay you back as soon as they can and make it up to you. You’ve only known each other for a couple of months. What would you do?

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What is a rubber ducky?

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