No one wants to have their possessions stolen, however, unfortunately, it’s something that can happen in the UK’s towns and cities. This is why it’s important for you to have suitable home insurance to help protect your possessions in the unfortunate circumstance that you find yourself in following a burglary.

Which items are burglars most likely to steal and how much can it all cost to be replaced? Also, which locations in the UK had the highest level of household burglaries in 2020? We’ve put together the 2020 Stolen Goods Index to discover just that.

The worst regions for burglaries in 2020

Manchester has been classed as one of the worst regions for burglaries in 2020. However, following the implementation of a new IT system in July 2019, Greater Manchester Police were unable to supply data for the period July 2019 to March 2020, so were omitted from the regional breakdown. Therefore, Middlesbrough (with 22.73 residential burglaries per 1,000 households a year) has been placed at the top of our list for the worst region for burglaries because Manchester has been omitted.

At the other end of the spectrum, falling outside of the top 50 most burgled places in the UK, Cornwall only sees 2.19 residential burglaries per 1,000 households a year, meaning you’re over ten times less likely to get burgled there. 

Please note that the City of London and the Isles of Scilly have also been omitted as data was skewed by low resident population numbers.

The most common items stolen from a household

The figures show that 40% of items stolen from households are monetary i.e purses/wallets/money/cards, while 27% of stolen items are pieces of jewellery. Ensuring you have the best contents insurance for your needs, depending on the value of the contents within your home, will help protect you if your items are stolen.

The average cost of stolen items

The majority of items stolen from households are usually worth over £1,000 (44%), while only 19% of offences see goods stolen worth under £99.

The mean cost of stolen items burgled was £2,856, although this number is perhaps skewed by small numbers of thefts of extremely valuable items, while the median cost of stolen items was £600. 

When is your house most likely to be burgled?

Unsurprisingly, your home is most likely to be burgled in the evening or at night, with 61% of burglaries taking place after 6pm.

The most likely time for your home to be burgled is in the evening (between 6pm and midnight), with 34% of offences taking place between these hours.

How much can the cost of damage to my property be if I’m burgled?

Luckily, in the majority of cases (55%), damage to the property was valued at zero, so individuals didn’t have to worry about paying out for property damage on top of replacing their stolen goods.

The mean average of the total cost of damage to the property during a burglary was £1,413, taking into account the small number of offences with high costs, while the median cost was £300, which takes into account the high number of offences with no cost.

If you have combined home insurance cover and your property was damaged during a burglary, then you may be able to claim back the costs under your insurance policy, but please make sure to check with the policy conditions to ensure you are covered sufficiently.

And, while over half of the burglars were complete strangers to their victims, nearly a quarter (24%) were well acquainted with one another, suggesting the stealing of items from individuals homes could be linked to a personal vendetta.

Brought to you by our home insurance experts at comparethemarket.com

Methodology

All data sourced was from the Office of National Statistics ‘Nature of Crime: Burglary’ dataset, which is compiled from the Crime Survey for England and Wales (CSEW) and relates to the most recent period in which data is available (April 2019 to March 2020) for domestic household burglaries. The City of London and the Isles of Scilly have been omitted as data was skewed by low resident population numbers.

To work out the crimes by region, data was taken from the Office of National Statistics ‘Recorded crime data by Community Safety Partnership area’ dataset and relate to the year ending September 2020.

Note that following the implementation of a new IT system in July 2019, Greater Manchester Police were unable to supply data for the period July 2019 to March 2020, so were omitted from the regional breakdown.