Moving House Checklist

Moving home is hard work. Let us take away some of the pain with our useful checklist.

Sergei holding keys Sergei holding keys

What stage are you at?

Mortgage in principle
Home hunting
Tenancy application
Tenancy agreement
Mortgage application
Contracts
Preparing for the move
Moving day

Mortgage in principle

Use a mortgage calculator

What is a mortgage calculator?

Use our mortgage calculator to work out an estimate of what you can afford. Our mortgage calculator can help you work out how much you could borrow, as well as the monthly repayments you’d pay.

Top tip: play around with the different values, such as deposit, mortgage length and interest rate, to see how they could affect your monthly repayments.

Speak to a mortgage adviser

Do I need to speak to a mortgage adviser?

Now you have a rough idea of what you can afford, you should think about talking to a mortgage adviser. This is particularly useful if you’re a first-time buyer, as they’ll help walk you through the process and be able to answer any questions.

Top tip: for free mortgage advice, talk to our mortgage expert partners at London & Country Mortgages Ltd.

Apply for a mortgage in principle

What’s a mortgage in principle?

A mortgage in principle acts as proof that you’re able to borrow and are serious about buying. Some estate agents will want to see a mortgage agreement in principle before you can make an offer, particularly if you’re a first-time buyer.

You’ll need to provide various details about yourself (and anyone buying the property with you) as well as face a credit check.

A mortgage in principle isn’t the same as a mortgage offer (that comes later), but it’s a big step and gives you a firmer estimate as to what you’ll be able to borrow.

Home hunting

Decide what you’re looking for

What do I need to think about?

Think about the sort of home you need. Are you hoping to move to a bigger place for a growing family? Downsizing after the kids have flown the nest? Or are you moving for more outdoor space, or a place in the city?

Find homes to view

How do I find them?

Finding homes for sale is easier than ever. Thanks to sites like Rightmove, you can browse thousands of homes available in your area and beyond. You can search by area, before filtering for home type, number of bedrooms, price and more.

Arrange viewings

What do I need to do?

Once you’ve found some homes you like the look of, you should go and check them out in person. Pictures are great, but they can sometimes be misleading, so get a feel for the place by taking a look around. It’ll also give you a chance to ask any questions.

Top tip: if you’re new to home hunting, you should take someone along with you for advice.

Decide on your opening offer

How do I decide my opening offer?

Think about this carefully, as you’ll only be going up from here, which means it’s a good idea to start lower than you’re truly willing to pay. You want an opening offer that’s going to leave you with room to move, but will be taken seriously by the seller.

Make the offer

How do I make an offer?

Usually this will be handled by the estate agent, who will act as the go-between. They’ll relay the offer to the seller, and then tell you their response, once they’ve decided.

Top tip: if you’re making an offer that’s lower than the asking price, tell them why. If the seller knows why you’re haggling, they may be more willing to accept a lower offer.

A second offer

How do I negotiate?

If you offered less than the asking price, chances are your first offer was rejected. This is normal. The first offer is usually just to get things moving. You’ll want to make sure that your second offer is a good one, and a good place to start could be offering to meet them in the middle.

Top tip: use the estate agent to your advantage. Remember, the estate agent wants the sale to go through, so they can be very helpful. They might let you know what the seller is thinking, and may even tell you the magic figure you’ll need to hit to be accepted.

Offer accepted

Celebrate!

Don’t let us tell you how to celebrate, but make sure you mark the occasion somehow! There’s still plenty to do, but take the time to enjoy this moment.

Ask the seller if they’ll take their home off the market

Why should I do this?

To avoid ‘gazumping’, which is when someone outbids you after your offer was accepted, you could ask the seller to take their home off the market, making it harder for other buyers to find. This doesn’t guarantee anything, and the seller doesn’t have to do it, but it could improve your chances.

Mortgage application

Find a mortgage

How do I find the right mortgage?

You may have got your mortgage agreement in principle, but now it’s time to get the real thing. That’s where we can help, as we compare mortgages from dozens of lenders to help you get a better deal and order the results by cheapest monthly repayment.

Apply for your mortgage

How do I apply for a mortgage?

Once you’ve found a mortgage deal you like, it’s time to apply. The full mortgage application is longer than the agreement in principle, as lenders need lots of information about you, your income, outgoings and more. They’ll tell you everything you need to complete your application.

You can use our mortgage comparison service to apply directly through the lender. If you’re unsure about how to apply for a mortgage, you can chat to our mortgage partners from London & Country mortgages.

Property survey

What is a property survey?

The property survey is different to the searches, as it takes a closer look at the building itself. There are a few different types available, and you can pay more for a more thorough survey. For example, a homebuyer’s report is the basic standard, while a full structural survey goes into much further detail.

Top tip: if you’re buying an older home (say, 50-years-old or more) then a full structural survey is well worth considering. It could help spot serious issues which could save you a fortune in repairs down the line. If an issue is found, you can either use it to haggle the purchase price or cut your losses and find another property.

Contracts

Choose a solicitor

What are solicitors for?

You’ll need a solicitor to handle all the legal processes of the purchase and collate your documents. They’ll also work with the seller’s solicitors to get the deal over the line. Solicitors charge different fees, so it’s worth shopping around, but remember to take their reputation for customer service into account.

Top tip: choosing the same solicitor as your seller could speed up the process, with all the information and documents held with one firm.

The paperwork

What do I need to do?

Your solicitors will need you to complete a variety of paperwork. Thankfully this is usually online now. This will include ‘enquiries’, which involve question between buyers and sellers, information about contents to be included as part of the sale, details of the property’s boundaries, planning permission and more.

Property searches

What are property searches?

Property searches are completed to find out more information about the property. There are basic requirements, like making sure the home is connected to the sewage network, as well as local authority searches, to check for any building regulatory issues or development plans in the area.

Not all searches are required, but it’s recommended you get them all if possible. Your mortgage provider may even insist on them.

Pay your deposit

How do I pay my deposit?

To pay your deposit, you’ll need to transfer the funds to your solicitor, not the seller. Keep in mind that banks often have limits on how much you can transfer in a day, so you may need to arrange a CHAPS payment (Clearing House Automated Payment System).

Exchanging contracts

How does exchanging contracts work?

Once the deposit is paid, your solicitor will ask for your authority to exchange contracts. All parties must agree to this on the same day, for the exchange to be completed. All parties in the chain must also agree on a completion date at this time. Completion is the date you’ll all move in. Once this is done, the purchase/sale becomes legally binding. You now own the home! This means anything you had planned/booked as a placeholder can now be confirmed.

Celebrate (again!)

Woohoo!

You’ve finally done it! Exchanging contracts makes the purchase legally binding, so you can relax, knowing that you’ve made it. Another reason to celebrate, whether it’s a fancy meal, a takeaway or a glass of bubbles.

Make sure your new home is insured

Do I need home insurance?

Once you’ve exchanged contracts, you’re legally obligated to buy the home. This means you’re responsible for it, so you need to protect it with insurance. In fact, most mortgages will require you to get the property insured as part of your agreement.

Paying for your home

How do I pay for my new home?

Your mortgage lender and solicitor will arrange for the rest of the funds to be transferred to the seller’s solicitor. You won’t handle the money directly. Once this is done, you’ll receive the title deeds, confirming you legally own the home.

Pay your stamp duty tax

How do I pay stamp duty tax?

If you’re required to pay stamp duty tax on your new home, this will be handled through your solicitor. They may ask for the payment before completion, however, you’ll have 14 days to pay it afterwards.

Preparing for the move

Give notice to your landlord

What do I need to do?

If you're currently renting, you'll want to start thinking about giving your landlord notice about the move. You don't want to give formal notice too early, in case the purchase falls through, potentially leaving you with nowhere to live, but you also don't want to be paying both rent and a mortgage for months. Most landlord's ask for a month's notice, but check your tenancy agreement to be sure.

Order new furniture

When should I order new furniture?

If you're moving into a bigger place, you're going to need new furniture. You'll want to leave plenty of time for this before the move. For example, sofas can take several months to be delivered, and you don't want to spend the first few weeks in your new home sat on the floor! Top tip: if you know your moving date, it's a good idea to have things delivered to your new address. It'll save you room in the moving van and the extra heavy lifting…

Have a big clear-out

What do I need to do?

Try to avoid taking any clutter with you to your new home by having a big clear out. It'll save you plenty of time when it comes to unpacking after the move. Top tip: while you might not want some of your old stuff, someone else might. You could make a bit of money by selling it, or help someone by donating it.

Collect/order packing boxes

How many boxes do I need?

You're going to need plenty of boxes to pack your stuff. It can be hard to guess how many you'll need, so it's best to collect boxes and pack in stages. Top tip: avoid paying for boxes by saving any packaging from deliveries. You can also ask your local supermarket for spare boxes. They'll normally give them to you for free.

Get in touch with your utility suppliers

What do I need to tell them?

While there's no danger of your energy and water being cut off, you do need to let your suppliers know that you're moving. If your previous tariff has expired, you should consider switching energy suppliers to save money on a new tariff.

Get your internet and phone sorted

What do I need to do?

If that new home of yours hasn't got internet access, you may as well be moving into a cave… Don't forget to let your broadband provider know you're moving to avoid this from happening. If you're already tied into a contract, you should be able to just transfer your package to your new address. If you're out of contract, you should find out what new packages and speeds are available in your new area. Just enter your new postcode and we'll show you what's available.

Update your car insurance policy

Why do I need to update my car insurance?

You'll need to let your car insurance provider know that you're moving, so they can update your policy. If you move without telling them, and then need to make a claim, your policy will probably be void and any claim rejected.

Book the time off work for moving

When should I book the time off?

Final moving dates can be confirmed quite late on, so you'll want to at least let your work know when you're hoping to move and get the time booked off in principle. Once the date's confirmed, you can then confirm it with them, too.

Book your van hire or removals company

What do I need to do?

Once you know your moving day, you should book a professional removals company or, if you're doing it yourself, a hire van. It's a good idea to get a few quotes to compare prices, and you should book this as soon as possible to avoid places being booked up. Top tip: if you're doing the move yourself and hiring a van, it's a good idea to get one with a tail lift. This will make moving heavy furniture and appliances much easier.

Redirect your phone number

Do I need to redirect my phone number?

If you have a landline that you use, you might want to take that number with you. Get in touch with your phone provider to arrange the redirect for you.

Get your post re-directed

What do I need to do?

This is something most people forget, which leads to letters and parcels being lost to old addresses. To avoid losing potentially important or valuable deliveries, contact Royal Mail to have your post re-directed. You can pay to have this done for a three, six or 12-month period, while you get yourself sorted and can update your address everywhere.

Get packing

What should I pack first?

If you're going to be handling the move yourself, you should think about packing once you have a moving date (even a rough one). Avoid a mad rush at the last minute by spreading it out over a few weeks. Start with the inessentials that you don't need day-to-day, leaving the rest until the final few days. Top tip: clearly labelling and grouping your boxes is hugely helpful and will make moving day and unpacking much easier.

Make arrangements for kids and pets

What do I need to do?

If you've got young children or pets, you'll want someone to look after them on moving day. Whether it's friends, family, a babysitter, cattery or kennels, it'll be much easier to move without having to worry about them. Top tip: you'll want to give whoever's looking after them plenty of notice. Dog and cat-sitting services can book up quickly, and you'll also need to supply various documents for them, such as vaccination information.

Suss out your new property

What do I need to know?

Before you move into your new home, it's worth asking the current residents for some useful information, such as where certain things are located:
  • Boiler
  • Stopcock for the water supply
  • Fusebox
  • Gas and electricity meters
  • Thermostat and/or central heating settings

Talk to neighbours

What should I tell them?

It's normally a good idea to give your neighbours a heads up about the move. Moving home is always a busy day, so your neighbours will appreciate the notice about vans and any extra people who will be there. You might also want to talk to them about parking arrangements, to ensure that any vans etc. will be able to access your home.

Disconnect appliances

Which appliances should I disconnect?

Any appliances that can cause a mess will want to be disconnected well before the move starts. Washing machines will need to be disconnected and drained, while freezers will need to be defrosted. You don't want to be doing these things on the day of the move, as it takes time and makes a mess.

Pack a box of essentials

Which essentials should I pack?

Moving day can be hectic, which means you might not start unpacking properly on that first day. Having a clearly labelled, separate box filled with the essentials you'll need for that first night can be a life saver. Think toiletries, chargers, a change of outfit and some basic kitchenware. Top tip: get your bed set up as soon as possible on moving day. You don't want to be putting it together at 11pm, when you're exhausted after a long day of moving.

Let everyone know about your change of address

Who do I need to tell?

From friends and family to your favourite shops and service providers, you'll want to let them all know you've changed your address. Most can be done online, so here's a list of some of the essentials:
  • Banks, credit card and loan providers
  • Insurance providers
  • DVLA
  • Utility suppliers (energy, broadband, TV, phone etc.)
  • Employers, benefits services or pension providers
  • HMRC
  • Schools, colleges or university
  • Local council
  • GP, dentist and vets
  • TV licensing
  • Memberships and subscriptions (gyms, magazines etc.)
  • Shops and online retailers

Moving day

Complete and collect keys

When can I collect the keys?

At some point during the day, you’ll get the call to confirm your move has completed and the keys are ready to collect. Simply head to wherever they’re being held (usually with the estate agent) and then you’re ready to move in!

Clean

What do I need to do?

You wouldn’t want to walk into your new home to find it a mess, so neither will the people moving into your place. Some contracts will stipulate that your home must be professionally cleaned, but you might be able to just do it yourself.

Top tip: cleaning rooms as you pack them up will help spread the work out and save you from having to clean the entire home on moving day.

Collect and load the hire van

When should I collect the van?

If you’re hiring a van to move, you’ll want to collect it as early as possible. This means, even if you don’t have the keys yet, you can start loading the van and save time later.

Leave a list for the new occupants

What information should I include?

It’s a nice idea to leave a helpful list for the new people moving in. Some useful things to include:

  • Where the stopcock, fuse box and meters are
  • Current utility supplier details
  • Warranties and appliance instructions for anything staying behind
  • Which days the bins are collected

Take final meter readings

What do I need to do?

This should be one of the last things you do in the old house and one of the first things in the new one. Taking a meter reading (it’s useful to take photos for evidence) is important to ensure you’re billed correctly by your energy supplier. Particularly if you’re switching.

Unpack

What do I need to do?

Once you’ve done everything you need to at your old place, you can head to your new home and start unpacking.

Home hunting

Decide what you’re looking for

What do I need to think about?

Think about the sort of home you need. Are you hoping to move to a bigger place for a growing family? Downsizing after the kids have flown the nest? Or are you moving for more outdoor space, or a place in the city?

Find homes to view

How do I find them?

Finding homes for rent is easier than ever. Thanks to sites like Rightmove, you can browse thousands of homes available in your area and beyond. You can search by area, before filtering for home type, number of bedrooms, rent price and more.

Arrange viewings

What do I need to do?

Once you’ve found some homes you like the look of, you should go and check them out in person. Pictures are great, but they can sometimes be misleading, so get a feel for the place by taking a look around. It’ll also give you a chance to ask any questions.

Top tip: once you’ve found one you like, you should book a second viewing. This will give you a chance to look more carefully and ask any further questions. If you’re new to home hunting, you should take someone along with you for advice.

Meet the landlord

Why should I meet the landlord?

Any viewings will usually be hosted by an estate agent or the landlord. If you can arrange one with the landlord, this gives you the chance to get to know them a little, before committing to anything. This is important, because you don’t want to sign up to a year-long rental agreement, only to find out that the landlord is a nightmare to deal with.

Tenancy application

Submit a formal application

What do I need to do?

Now you’ve found a place you like, you’ll need to apply for a rental agreement. Once you’ve expressed your interest, the landlord will need you to complete several steps and checks.

Pay a holding deposit

What’s a holding deposit?

To hold the property while your application is processed and rental agreement confirmed, you’ll need to put down a holding deposit. This isn’t the full tenancy deposit, which comes later, but it’s simply to signal to the landlord that you’re serious and that they shouldn’t make an agreement with anyone else.

Reference checks

What are reference checks?

You’ll need to provide references to your potential new landlord. It should be a relatively straightforward form, and involves filling out your address history, including contact details of any former landlords within a certain period. You’ll also need a reference from your employer.

Financial checks

What are financial checks?

While these aren’t as thorough as a mortgage application, a landlord will want to check that you can afford to keep up with your rent. They’ll run a credit check on you, to check your credit history, while they’ll also want information about your annual income.

Pass the application stage

What do I need to do?

If you’ve done everything right so far, hopefully your application will be accepted. Now to reach a tenancy agreement…

Tenancy agreement

Agree a move in date

What do I need to do?

Before you sign anything, you should agree a move in date with the landlord. You may need to be a bit flexible with this, as the landlord may have to deal with the transition from the previous tenant, but make sure you’re happy with the date.

Confirm your tenancy agreement

What is the tenancy agreement?

Now you’ve completed your application and passed the reference and financial checks, you now need to confirm your tenancy agreement. This is your rental contract between you (the tenant) and your landlord, setting out the terms of your tenancy, including the responsibilities of each party.

It’s really important that you read this carefully. Once you sign, it’s a legally binding contract, making you responsible for the terms which apply to you. If you disagree with any of the terms, you could try negotiating with your landlord.

Pay your deposit

How do I pay my deposit?

When you sign your tenancy agreement, you’ll also need to pay your tenancy deposit, along with the first month’s rent. The deposit amount will be confirmed in your tenancy agreement. The deposit will need to be registered with a government-approved deposit scheme, so make sure you discuss this with the landlord.

Celebrate!

Woohoo!

You’ve done it! Once the deposit is paid and the tenancy agreement is signed, the move is official. Take the time to celebrate, whether it’s a fancy meal, a takeaway or a glass of bubbles.

Preparing for the move

Give notice to your current landlord

How much notice do I need to give my landlord?

Now you’ve agreed to move into your new place, you’ll need to give your current landlord notice about the move. It’s usually a month’s notice, but check your existing tenancy agreement to be sure.

Make sure your new home is insured

Do I need to insure a home I rent?

Your landlord is responsible for insuring the building, but you may want to cover your furniture and other belongings with contents insurance.

Order new furniture

When should I order new furniture?

If you’re moving into a bigger place, you’re going to need new furniture. You’ll want to leave plenty of time for this before the move. For example, sofas can take several months to be delivered, and you don’t want to spend the first few weeks in your new home sat on the floor!

Top tip: if you know your moving date, it’s a good idea to have things delivered to your new address. It’ll save you room in the moving van and the extra heavy lifting…

Have a big clear-out

What do I need to do?

Try to avoid taking any clutter with you to your new home by having a big clear out. It’ll save you plenty of time when it comes to unpacking after the move.

Top tip: while you might not want some of your old stuff, someone else might. You could make a bit of money by selling it, or help someone by donating it.

Collect/order packing boxes

How many boxes do I need?

You’re going to need plenty of boxes to pack your stuff. It can be hard to guess how many you’ll need, so it’s best to collect boxes and pack in stages.

Top tip: avoid paying for boxes by saving any packaging from deliveries. You can also ask your local supermarket for spare boxes. They’ll normally give them to you for free.

Get in touch with your utility suppliers

What do I need to tell them?

While there’s no danger of your energy and water being cut off, you do need to let your suppliers know that you’re moving. If your previous tariff has expired, you should consider switching energy suppliers to save money on a new tariff.

Get your internet and phone sorted

What do I need to do?

If that new home of yours hasn’t got internet access, you may as well be moving into a cave… Don’t forget to let your broadband provider know you’re moving to avoid this from happening. If you’re already tied into a contract, you should be able to just transfer your package to your new address. If you’re out of contract, you should find out what new packages and speeds are available in your new area. Just enter your new postcode and we’ll show you what’s available.

Update your car insurance policy

Why do I need to update my car insurance?

You’ll need to let your car insurance provider know that you’re moving, so they can update your policy. If you move without telling them, and then need to make a claim, your policy will probably be void and any claim rejected.

Book the time off work for moving

When should I book the time off?

Final moving dates can be confirmed quite late on, so you’ll want to at least let your work know when you’re hoping to move and get the time booked off in principle. Once the date’s confirmed, you can then confirm it with them, too.

Book your van hire or removals company

What do I need to do?

Once you know your moving day, you should book a professional removals company or, if you’re doing it yourself, a hire van. It’s a good idea to get a few quotes to compare prices, and you should book this as soon as possible to avoid places being booked up.

Top tip: if you’re doing the move yourself and hiring a van, it’s a good idea to get one with a tail lift. This will make moving heavy furniture and appliances much easier.

Redirect your phone number

Do I need to redirect my phone number?

If you have a landline that you use, you might want to take that number with you. Get in touch with your phone provider to arrange the redirect for you.

Get your post re-directed

What do I need to do?

This is something most people forget, which leads to letters and parcels being lost to old addresses. To avoid losing potentially important or valuable deliveries, contact Royal Mail to have your post re-directed. You can pay to have this done for a three, six or 12-month period, while you get yourself sorted and can update your address everywhere.

Get packing

What should I pack first?

If you’re going to be handling the move yourself, you should think about packing once you have a moving date (even a rough one). Avoid a mad rush at the last minute by spreading it out over a few weeks. Start with the inessentials that you don’t need day-to-day, leaving the rest until the final few days.

Top tip: clearly labelling and grouping your boxes is hugely helpful and will make moving day and unpacking much easier.

Make arrangements for kids and pets

What do I need to do?

If you’ve got young children or pets, you’ll want someone to look after them on moving day. Whether it’s friends, family, a babysitter, cattery or kennels, it’ll be much easier to move without having to worry about them.

Top tip: you’ll want to give whoever’s looking after them plenty of notice. Dog and cat-sitting services can book up quickly, and you’ll also need to supply various documents for them, such as vaccination information.

Suss out your new property

What do I need to know?

Before you move into your new home, it’s worth asking the landlord for some useful information, such as where certain things are located:

  • Boiler
  • Stopcock for the water supply
  • Fusebox
  • Gas and electricity meters
  • Thermostat and/or central heating settings

Talk to neighbours

What should I tell them?

It’s normally a good idea to give your neighbours a heads up about the move. Moving home is always a busy day, so your neighbours will appreciate the notice about vans and any extra people who will be there. You might also want to talk to them about parking arrangements, to ensure that any vans etc. will be able to access your home.

Disconnect appliances

Which appliances should I disconnect?

Any appliances that can cause a mess will want to be disconnected well before the move starts. Washing machines will need to be disconnected and drained, while freezers will need to be defrosted. You don’t want to be doing these things on the day of the move, as it takes time and makes a mess.

Pack a box of essentials

Which essentials should I pack?

Moving day can be hectic, which means you might not start unpacking properly on that first day. Having a clearly labelled, separate box filled with the essentials you’ll need for that first night can be a life saver. Think toiletries, chargers, a change of outfit and some basic kitchenware.

Top tip: get your bed set up as soon as possible on moving day. You don’t want to be putting it together at 11pm, when you’re exhausted after a long day of moving.

Let everyone know about your change of address

Who do I need to tell?

From friends and family to your favourite shops and service providers, you’ll want to let them all know you’ve changed your address. Most can be done online, so here’s a list of some of the essentials:

  • Banks, credit card and loan providers
  • Insurance providers
  • DVLA
  • Utility suppliers (energy, broadband, TV, phone etc.)
  • Employers, benefits services or pension providers
  • HMRC
  • Schools, colleges or university
  • Local council
  • GP, dentist and vets
  • TV licensing
  • Memberships and subscriptions (gyms, magazines etc.)
  • Shops and online retailers

Moving day

Clean

What do I need to do?

You wouldn’t want to walk into your new home to find it a mess, so neither will the people moving into yours. If you’re already renting, your existing tenancy agreement will explain the expectations regarding the state of the property when you move out.

Top tip: cleaning rooms as you pack them up will help spread the work out and save you from having to clean the entire home on moving day.

Collect and load the hire van

When should I collect the van?

If you’re hiring a van to move, you’ll want to collect it as early as possible. This means, even if you don’t have the keys yet, you can start loading the van and save time later.

Collect the keys

When can I collect the keys?

At some point during the day, you’ll get the call to confirm the keys are ready to collect. Simply head to wherever they’re being held (usually with the landlord or estate agent) and then you’re ready to move in!

Take final meter readings

What do I need to do?

This should be one of the last things you do in the old house and one of the first things in the new one. Taking a meter reading (it’s useful to take photos for evidence) is important to ensure you’re billed correctly by your energy supplier. Particularly if you’re switching.

Unpack

What do I need to do?

Once you’ve done everything you need to at your old place, you can head to your new home and start unpacking.

Check the inventory list

What do I need to do?

When you move in, you should be provided with an inventory for the property. This details any furniture, appliances etc. along with their condition. It’s important that you check this carefully, because this will also be reviewed when you leave. If items are missing or damaged (excluding wear and tear), you could be charged and deductions taken from your deposit. If you have an issue with anything in the inventory, raise it with your landlord ASAP.

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